FAQ’s

How was the eGames created?

In May 2015, a group of eSports and sports industry leaders met at Pinewood Studios in the UK to discuss the importance of having an officially recognised eSports pinnacle competition - which was not just about prize money, but inspiring national pride.

A new organisation, based in Buckinghamshire, was set up to achieve this and create a new global competition.

Discussions then took place with the UK Government who welcomed the plans to promote eSports in the UK and internationally. From this, the not-for-profit International eGames Committee (IEGC) was formed with the aim of positively shaping the future of competitive gaming.


How is the UK Government involved?

The initial support came from the Right Honourable Sajid Javid MP, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills. In January 2016, he gave authority to set up the British organisation and wrote: "I fully appreciate the economic value of video games and believe the industry is important to our economy and its future growth. I welcome any industry moves to collaborate on developing best practice and promote the UK as a leading nation in the sector. I am keen for government to develop and maintain dialogue with all sectors of the economy and collaborate on planning for growth."


What is the main aim of the IEGC?

The aim of the IEGC is to positively shape the future of global eSports competitions by instilling good governance and creating a more inclusive and diverse culture for competitive video gaming. The introduction of "The eGames" sees a new international medal-only based competition. The eGames will aim to create national pride, new national heroes and patriotic fans.


Why is there no prize money?

As in traditional sports, it is important to have events that generate national pride for athletes and fans alike, such as the Davis Cup in Tennis and the Ryder Cup in Golf. It was felt it's important to put eSports on the same level as traditional sports. There is so much skill, dedication and commitment required to be a pro gamer, giving them more opportunities to compete was felt by all as a positive.